Shaping the Circle

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WHY GERMANS SETTLED IN INDIANAPOLIS

In the Midwest the German immigrant found what he was searching for: both work and land. Compared with other regions the land was still cheap, and in many instances the immigrant could buy directly from the government land office. The Midwest was developing rapidly, and artisans, skilled workers, professional men, and laborers were in demand. In addition, most crops cultivated in the Midwest were familiar to the German; therefore, no fundamental reorientation was required on his part. . . .

It is apparent that the German immigrants in Indianapolis were numerous enough by 1850 to make an impact upon society. At least one-eighth of the population had come from the Germanies. However, this is still not the total of those of ethnic German origin in the city, for there is good reason to believe that a large percentage of those people who had come from the Middle Atlantic states, particularly Pennsylvania, and from Ohio, were of German stock. . . . [This nucleus of German immigrants] was destined to be enlarged and stimulated by the coming of other Germans during succeeding decades.

 


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Updated: 29 April 2004, RKB
Comments: speccoll@iupui.edu
URL: http://www.ulib.iupui.edu/special/digproj/circle/exhibit1_3.html

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