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Staff

The staff should be sufficient in size and quality to meet the programmatic and service needs of its primary users. Librarians, including the director, should have a graduate degree from an ALA-accredited program. In addition, there may be other professional staff who will have appropriate training, experience, or degrees. All library professionals should be responsible for and participate in professional activities. The support staff and student assistants should be assigned responsibilities appropriate to their qualifications, training, experience, and capabilities. The further development of professional and support staff should be promoted through an on-going commitment to continuing education, including training on security, emergencies, and the preservation of materials. Professional library staff should be covered by a written policy that clearly establishes their status, rights and responsibilities. This policy should be consistent with the ACRL Standards for Faculty Status for College and University Librarians.

  1. Does the library employ staff capable of supporting and delivering information in all available formats, including electronic resources?
  2. Is sufficient budgetary support provided to ensure the ongoing training of all staff?
  3. Does the library have qualified librarians, other professional staff, skilled support staff, and student assistants in adequate numbers to meet its needs?
  4. How does the college ensure that the library's professional staff have the appropriate accredited degrees, and how does it encourage them to engage in appropriate professional activities?
  5. How does the size of the library staff relate to the goals and services of the library, the college's programs, degrees, enrollment, size of the faculty and staff, and auxiliary programs?
  6. How do library staff policies and procedures compare with college guidelines and sound personnel management, especially in the areas of hiring, recruitment, appointment, contract renewal, promotion, tenure, dismissal and appeal?
  7. How do staff members who are responsible for instruction maintain sufficient knowledge and skills to be effective instructors?
  8. How does the library provide security, preservation, and emergency training for its staff?

1. Does the library employ staff capable of supporting and delivering information in all available formats, including electronic resources?

Yes. Recruitment of librarians is done on the national level. Additionally, an excellent library science program, the Indiana University Department of Library and Information Science, is housed on campus. As a function of this, emerging trends in librarianship, as well as librarians schooled in such trends, are readily utilized. Support staff are highly knowledgeable and are well trained in their respective areas of information delivery. While print resources are still an important component of the information scene, electronic resources at IUPUI are plentiful and both librarians and staff are capable of helping patrons utilize these resources.
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2. Is sufficient budgetary support provided to ensure the ongoing training of all staff?

Yes. Training on new resources is provided on an ongoing basis as these products are introduced and implemented. Additionally, several times a year, training in subjects ranging from diversity to meeting management is provided to administration, librarians, and staff.
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3. Does the library have qualified librarians, other professional staff, skilled support staff, and student assistants in adequate numbers to meet its needs?

Yes. While there are times in which scheduling becomes challenging in a particular department, the number of available employees generally meets the needs of the university and the community. However, with the current staff, it would be difficult to assume new initiatives without relinquishing other services. Reorganization to a team based environment has been undertaken in order to better address the needs of the academic units on campus.
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4. How does the college ensure that the library's professional staff have the appropriate accredited degrees, and how does it encourage them to engage in appropriate professional activities?

Prior to starting, newly hired librarians must provide proof of having acquired an ALA accredited MLS (or the equivalent). Engagement in professional activities is a virtual requirement for tenure, promotion, or other such progress. The Office of Professional Development, housed within the library building, and professional development funds help facilitate such activities.
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5. How does the size of the library staff relate to the goals and services of the library, the college's programs, degrees, enrollment, size of the faculty and staff, and auxiliary programs?

The library staff has been able to be responsive to the needs of the institution. Within the team based structure, there are Client Based Teams whose members serve as liaisons to their respective academic units. Instruction, collection development, and reference consultation are all a part of this relationship. Other teams have support responsibilities within the library in areas such as Acquisitions, Bibliographic and Metadata Services, Digital Library initiatives, computer support. The largest growth in staff has been in the technology area to support the mission of the University Library to remain in the forefront in the use of technology.

The Indianapolis campus enrollment for fall 2002/03 was 27,619 students from 46 states and 115 countries for 282,455.5 credit hours. There are 22 Schools and 2 other academic programs represented on campus offering 180 degrees with a full-time faculty of 1,397 and 887 part-time faculty. There are currently 29 full-time librarians or one librarian for every 952 students. The professional schools of medicine, dentistry, and law are served by separate libraries and staff although these clientele also use the University Library, and all campus libraries collaborate on service and collection development whenever possible.

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6. How do library staff policies and procedures compare with college guidelines and sound personnel management, especially in the areas of hiring, recruitment, appointment, contract renewal, promotion, tenure, dismissal and appeal?

Within the library, there is a position that coordinates hiring and other such personnel issues. This individual is well versed in campus and library policy. Searches for professional positions are conducted under system-wide guidelines and all candidates must be approved by the Affirmative Action Office. Promotion and Tenure Committees handle issues of professional progress. Promotion and Tenure Committees exist at the library level, the campus level, and the system level. Librarians are included in the same campus and system policies related to dismissal and appeal that cover faculty. Mentors are assigned to new librarians who have not yet been tenured. There is a mid-tenure review process to help librarians assess their career progress.

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7. How do staff members who are responsible for instruction maintain sufficient knowledge and skills to be effective instructors?

Instruction is an important topic for the library. Learning Communities and other such academic initiatives on campus have provided ample opportunities for library instruction. One librarian from each client based team is assigned to represent them in a working group for instruction that is shepherded by an Instruction Coordinator. There are numerous opportunities for librarians to take part in workshops offered by the Office for Professional Development. There is heavy reliance upon librarians to keep themselves abreast of appropriate educational techniques and materials. There has been limited sharing of instruction techniques within client based teams. A librarian has been placed within the Center for Teaching and Learning to develop and encourage learning activities for librarians in the area of instruction.

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8. How does the library provide security, preservation, and emergency training for its staff?

When issues of security arise, information is disseminated to the library staff via e-mail and/or in team meetings. A library security office is housed on the first floor of the library to handle security and emergencies. Some emergency training for staff is provided by the IUPUI Human Resources, but these are usually elective programs. There are no systematic emergency training programs for the staff.

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Last updated by lcalvert on 03/18/2013