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Access

Access to library resources should be provided in a timely and orderly fashion. Library collections and the catalog for accessing them should be organized using national bibliographic standards. A central catalog of library resources should provide access for multiple concurrent users and clearly indicate all resources. Provision should be made for interlibrary loan, consortial borrowing agreements, access to virtual electronic collections, and document delivery to provide access to materials not owned by the library. Furthermore, distance learning programs should be supported by equivalent means such as remote electronic access to collections, the provision of reliable network connections, and electronic transmission or courier delivery of library materials to remote users. Policies regarding access should be appropriately disseminated to library users.

  1. What methods are used to provide maximum intellectual and physical accessibility to the library and its resources?
  2. How are the accuracy and currency of the catalog assured?
  3. Is the arrangement of the collections logical and understandable?
  4. Does the library provide timely and effective interlibrary loan or document delivery service for materials not owned by the library?
  5. Does the library participate in available consortial borrowing programs?
  6. Does the library provide sufficient numbers of appropriately capable computer workstations for access to electronic resources?
  7. Is access to the catalog and to other library resources available across campus and off-campus?
  8. If materials are located in a storage facility, are those materials readily accessible?
  9. In what ways does the library provide for its users who are engaged in distance learning programs?

1. What methods are used to provide maximum intellectual and physical accessibility to the library and its resources?

Intellectual accessibility to the library and its resources is provided through the University Library's online catalog, IUCAT, and our Internet Web site. Most materials, including audio-visual items, special collections, selected Web pages, and electronic resources are cataloged in IUCAT and OCLC, the international bibliographic utility, with the exception of electronic journals in large aggregate databases. The University Library tries to arrange licenses that include remote delivery through a proxy server verification for all electronic resources.

All residents of the State of Indiana are eligible to use any library resource, paper or digital, within the library building and may check out eligible materials. Materials are also available to patrons through inter-library loan.

Physical accessibility is available within the University Library 97 hours a week. However, our Web site and online catalog is available 24 hours a day. Many library activity requests can also be made through the Web site, e.g., inter-library loan requests and reference questions. Reserve materials can also be accessed electronically at any time.

The reference desk is staffed 92% of the opening hours for personal assistance. Interactive reference assistance through the Internet is available for limited time periods as well, but reference questions may be submitted at anytime through Web forms on the Internet.

The library conforms to all the current ADA requirements. There are special rooms on the third floor staffed by Adaptive Learning Services to assist those who require additional services. However, lack of near-by parking does cause problems for some types of disabilities. There is wheel chair access from several parking garages under cover to the University Library.

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2. How are the accuracy and currency of the catalog assured?

The Bibliographic and Metadata Services Team maintains the accuracy of the IUPUI University Library, Herron Library, and Columbus Library information supplied to the union catalog, IUCAT, for all formats. Librarians from IUPUI also serve on system-wide committees dealing with issues of catalog maintenance and construction. Any errors noticed by librarians within the system or by the general public are conveyed to the appropriate cataloging unit for correction. Some updating of catalog information, such as changed subject headings, can be done globally by a system-approved cataloging unit.

The current status of the library materials is available to the public through the online catalog: on order, cataloged, checked-out and due date, at bindery, on shelf. New print materials are cataloged on the average within one week's time. Rush materials are processed within 24 hours. Approval plan books are usually available within two days. Serial or periodical issues are checked-in and available on shelves within 24 hours of receipt. New serials cataloging is usually completed within a month of the receipt of the first issue.

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3. Is the arrangement of the collections logical and understandable?

The main print collection, both monographs and serials, is arranged according to the Library of Congress call number scheme with the bulk of the collection on the 3rd and 4th floors. Exceptions to this arrangement are materials in the Reference area, the Philanthropic Studies Library, Circulation, Special Collections, and the Herron Art Library.

The Reference area contains:

a) Reference works, arranged by call number;
b) Current periodicals and newspapers arranged by title;
c) Microforms, arranged by call number
d) Government documents, arranged by the Superintendent of Documents Classification scheme.
The Reference staff can consequently more easily serve patrons using these materials.

The Philanthropic Studies Library contains printed works, both monographic and serial, more specific to philanthropy.

Special Collections houses rare books and archival materials, including the University Archives. Rare books are fully cataloged and shelved by call number. Archival materials are accessed and arranged through standard archival practices. Collection level records for archives are available in the online catalog, and a majority of inventories for archival collections are accessible through the Special Collections Web site. Several exhibits of materials are also available at the Web site.

Circulation houses print and electronic reserve materials, inter-library loan materials, and audio-visual formats.

The Herron Art Library is currently located at 16th St. with the Herron School of Art, but both are scheduled to move onto the main campus within five years. Only selected art materials more closely related to the curriculum are housed at the Herron Art Library because of space limitations. This will be true in the new location as well. The Herron Art Library is also the repository for the University Library's slide collection. The slide collection is being entered into a database for easier retrieval.

All locations are reflected within the catalog entries in the online catalog.

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4. Does the library provide timely and effective interlibrary loan or document delivery service for materials not owned by the library?

The Interlibrary Services department provides interlibrary loan to faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, and university staff. The library absorbs all associated costs. Users may place requests using paper forms or electronically via the library web site. Renewals may be requested in person, by telephone, or via electronic mail.

The department fills borrowing requests using local, state, national, and international sources. The department makes use of reciprocal partnerships on the local, state-wide, and national level. The department will also contact professional associations, publishers, authors, and other organizations to fill requests.

The ratio of borrowing requests to combined student and faculty FTE is .66 : 1. As a net lender, the ratio of lending requests to borrowing requests at IUPUI University Library is 3 : 1. The average turnaround time for borrowing requests including photocopies and loans is 7 days. We are currently able to supply 85% of all requests, and whenever possible, photocopy requests are delivered electronically.

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5. Does the library participate in available consortial borrowing programs?

University Library participates in free statewide reciprocal lending and borrowing and is a member of INCOLSA, the Indiana Cooperative Library Services Authority, the state's OCLC provider. INCOLSA operates a courier service delivery to and from multi-type libraries throughout the state. University Library receives deliveries five days per week. The library also has over 300 reciprocal agreements with other libraries across the country.
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6. Does the library provide sufficient numbers of appropriately capable computer workstations for access to electronic resources?

There are over 300 computers with both PC and MAC platforms available to the public. One high quality laser printer is available for every 20 computers. High quality laser color printing is also available for a minimal cost. The library computers are replaced on a life cycle of approximately 4 years within base budget funding. To date charges are not being made for most printing. In 2001 there were 4,600,000 sheets of paper purchased for public printing. Both library resources and computer application software packages are available on library computers. Computer software versions are synchronized with campus standards. Older computers are available for those who just want to use e-mail services. The library computers are always among the newest on campus both in terms of hardware and operating systems.

The University Library teamed with the University College to bring the first major implementation of wireless technology to the campus which allows students with wireless laptops to gain connectivity to the campus network in either building. The user can actually move between buildings without losing connectivity. There are also approximately 600 wired carrels useable by patrons with an Ethernet enabled laptop that would allow them access to the campus network and the Internet.


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7. Is access to the catalog and to other library resources available across campus and off-campus?

Yes. The online catalog is available to the general public through the Internet and access to digital resources licensed by the University Library are available to all students, faculty, and staff through the Internet with very few exceptions.
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8. If materials are located in a storage facility, are those materials readily accessible?

There are no remote storage facilities. University Library, the Law Library, the Medical Library, the Dental Library, and the Art Library are all located within reasonable proximity of each other and the academic buildings on campus.
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9. In what ways does the library provide for its users who are engaged in distance learning programs?

The remote user is a major focus of the University Library's mission. The University Library attempts to provide remote access to all licensed digital databases. There are very few exceptions. Also, many of the library's services are available through the Internet on the University Library Web site, e.g., inter-library loan request forms, delivery of electronic documents, electronic reserves, and renewals. A number of materials are being digitized for remote access, e.g., slide collections: Herron Art Image Library and the John C. Tacoma Mushroom Slide Collection.
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Last updated by lcalvert on 08/03/2007