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Sex Sells, If You're Willing to Show A Lot of Skin

book coverTwo of IUPUI's savviest faculty authors, Aaron Carroll and Rachel Vreeman, recently released their third book in a popular, myth-debunking consumer health series. The first two titles did well, but this one will be a big hit--sex sells:

Carroll, Aaron E., and Rachel C. Vreeman. Don't Put That in There!: And 69 Other Sex Myths Debunked. New York: St. Martin's Griffin, 2014.

IUPUIScholarWorks Quarterly Report, April-June 2014

The second quarter of 2014 is behind us. It's time to tally up the submissions to IUPUIScholarWorks! While working furiously to upgrade our DSpace version (again, version 4 coming soon), we also uploaded a healthy collection of scholarly materials--now free to readers from around the world. Here's what's new for the second quarter of 2014:

Scholarly Articles: 185
Dissertations & Theses: 83
Posters, presentations & other gray literature: 59

That's 327 new items this quarter--bringing our year-to-date total up to 608 items.

Of the items submitted within the last 12 months, the following drew the most web traffic during this quarter:

We're Sexy and We Know It

In the most recent issue of C&RL News, the ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee provides a short overview of what's hot: "Top trends in academic libraries: a review of the trends and issues affecting academic libraries in higher education." (I read the paper version, by the way--proving, perhaps, that even here in the Center for Digital Scholarship, some things do not get on my desk until they literally get on my desk.) Anyway, in case you're not a CR&L News reader, here are the seven trends:

Data
Device neutral digital services
Evolving openness in higher education
Student success
Competency-based learning
Altmetrics
Digital humanities

Funds for Your Open Access Article Publishing Fees

Last Fall, September 2013, IUPUI launched an Open Access Publishing Fund. Faculty members that wish to publish an article in a trusted, fully open access journal, may apply to the Fund to support article processing fees. With the average article processing fee hovering at about $1,000, this is a great opportunity for IUPUI authors.

As of today, the Fund has encumbered or spent 30% of the available funds ($47,000) in supporting fees for ten articles.

Published:

Surprise! Harvard is a Hornet's Nest of Copyright Infringement

Hornet

PiccoloNamek,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Baldie.jpg

IUPUIScholarWorks Quarterly Report, January-March 2014

The first quarter of this year has been a good one for IUPUIScholarWorks. While upgrading our version of DSpace, we also rebuilt our community list on the home page. Currently, thirteen IUPUI schools have collections in ScholarWorks. (We hope that the few remaining schools will create collections before the end of the year.) While making improvements to the website, we were also busy posting new submissions to the repository. Here's what's new in IUPUIScholarWorks for the first quarter of 2014:

Scholarly Articles: 125
ETDs: 124
Gray Literature: 32

We're well on our way to providing open access to over 1,000 new items in the year 2014!

According to Google Analytics popular, recent (4/1/2013-3/31/2014) submissions include:

My Thoughts about the FIRST Act: Public Access is Not Enough

Many scholars and librarians support public access to research publications funded by U.S. taxpayers. It's hard to argue with the idea that the people who paid for this research have a right to read the results without having to pay a third party (often a commercial publisher) for access. But, in making the case for open access to research published by faculty working at a public university, I sometimes meet supporters of public access that assume the access problem has been solved by federal policy. Reader, we have a problem.

"Open Access," is it a Proper Noun?

Recently I've noticed a tendency in my prose to capitalize the words "Open Access." Somehow my mind turned a concept into a brand. I had some help, of course. For a shorthand, many that write about open access use the initialism "OA." It's easy to see how that might introduce capitalization when it comes time to spell out both words--so, "open access" becomes "OA" which is reborn as "Open Access." And, then, many fine OA advocates have worked to make Open Access a brand. With manifestos, conferences, books, and the ever present icon, Open Access is a brand--and that's a good thing too. Without all of this attention (scholarly articles, library flyers, t-shirts, and Internet marketing) many would fail to consider the benefits of open access practices; many more would assume that OA is merely something offered by big name publishers at the steep price tag of $3,000 per article. (Yes, even the subscription publishers are cashing in on the Open Access brand.)Open Access Icon    

What's Hot on IUPUIScholarWorks: Looking at a Year (2012-2013)

IUPUIScholarWorks serves as the institutional repository for open access to works by IUPUI's faculty, students and community. If you're at IUPUI and you have something you want to post, join, look us up or send us a note.

Now that six months have passed since the end of the 2012/2013 school year, I thought it would be fun to see what we made available last year and how people are using it. Last year (July 1, 2012 - June 30, 2013) IUPUIScholarWorks collected 513 articles, theses, dissertations, posters, learning objects, reports and historical items. During that year, the repository received 57,995 unique visitors and 198,031 pageviews. The hottest submissions for the year currently include, by unique pageviews (PVs):

Open House at the Center for Digital Scholarship: November 22, 2013

Center for Digital ScholarshipTo celebrate the launch of the Center for Digital Scholarship we will also host a special open house in November for the campus and the community to learn more about our work. The event will take place from 2 to 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22, on the ground floor of the University Library.

The center works to provide open access to IUPUI scholarship, research data and the cultural heritage of our communities. With Kristi L. Palmer as director, the center disseminates unique scholarship, data and artifacts created by IUPUI faculty, students, staff and community partners; advocates for the rights of authors, fair use and open access to information and publications; implements best practices for the creation, description, preservation, sharing and reuse of digital collections; and provides digital scholarship consultations and literacy services.