Blogs

Proof of Impact

In 2007 IUPUI University Library partnered with the IUPUI Graduate Office to begin providing open access to students’ theses and dissertations.  In our promotional activities we focused on the benefits to students.  Their scholarship is:

Updated Apr 17, 2014 by Interim Dean

Brock's Birds of Indiana in IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship’s Cultural Heritage Collection

Spring is in the air in Indianapolis, a perfect time to turn our attention to the exciting changes in wildlife that this time of year brings.  And, with spring comes the annual influx of migratory birds.  Amazingly, some of these bird species return to our state from tropical wintering grounds as far away as the South American continent. 

Brock’s Birds of Indiana, part of the IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship’s Cultural Heritage Collection, contains a wealth of information of the birds that can be found in our state.  This information packed resource contains historical notes as well as population and distribution information for bird species occurring in Indiana.  One can also find details of when to expect the arrival and departure of Indiana’s migrant birds.  This is truly a treasure trove of information for nature enthusiasts, bird biologists, or anyone interested in learning more about the birds in our state.

Updated Apr 11, 2014 by Sciences Librarian

IUPUIScholarWorks Quarterly Report, January-March 2014

The first quarter of this year has been a good one for IUPUIScholarWorks. While upgrading our version of DSpace, we also rebuilt our community list on the home page. Currently, thirteen IUPUI schools have collections in ScholarWorks. (We hope that the few remaining schools will create collections before the end of the year.) While making improvements to the website, we were also busy posting new submissions to the repository. Here's what's new in IUPUIScholarWorks for the first quarter of 2014:

Scholarly Articles: 125
ETDs: 124
Gray Literature: 32

We're well on our way to providing open access to over 1,000 new items in the year 2014!

According to Google Analytics popular, recent (4/1/2013-3/31/2014) submissions include:

Updated Mar 27, 2016 by Scholarly Communication Librarian

Digital Scholarship Dining

The staff of IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship spent a great deal of time (rightly so) toiling over: 1. Defining digital scholarship and, 2. What services we would focus on in connection with this definition. We struggled with describing digital scholarship similarly to others, wanting to ensure some cohesion with our national and international colleagues.  We also wanted to create a mission and suite of services that was unique to and served our university.   Creating a mission statement is precarious enough, add to this a yet solidly defined area of study and prepare to see a group of structure craving librarians squirm.   

Updated Apr 04, 2014 by Interim Dean

IUPUI Faculty Taking Advantage of the Digital Scholarship Fund

A few years ago Dean Lewis implemented a fund to assist faculty who are interested in developing digital collections that will enhance and advance their research agenda.  Faculty can use the fund to explore new modes of analysis, creation and dissemination where technology plays a significant role. 

Faculty Highlight

In 2011 I began working with Dr. Bob White to create an online and open-access collection that offers resources for students, teachers, and scholars that are interested in Irish History, Irish politics, social movements, political activism, and “terrorism.”

According to Dr. White, “The Irish Republican Movement Collection provides unique resources for the understanding the transformation of Provisional Irish Republicanism and for understanding those who opposed that transformation, including contemporary ‘dissident’ Irish Republicans."

The collection includes 4 Irish Newspapers and a streaming video created by Dr. White. 
http://ulib.iupui.edu/digitalscholarship/collections/IrishRepublicanMovement

Updated Dec 11, 2015 by Webmaster

Strategies to get a handle on all your digital stuff: Project planning and management

Admittedly, I spend more time thinking about project management than I would like, sometimes to the detriment of actually getting stuff done. On the other hand, I have realized that the processing through the organizational issues helps me to map out and articulate what it will take to complete a particular project. Since I've found the workflows and tools posts from other professionals helpful, I'll share my approach and hope that this helps someone else besides me.

Project planning

I tend to take on too many projects, mostly of my own creation, so I try to inject a dose of realism into the scoping process. This helps me to figure out if I can actually accomplish what I want and helps to determine the timeframe. This sounds more formal than it really is. Basically, I try to sketch out the following on a single page:

Updated Mar 24, 2014 by hcoates

Exploring OER

Last week, I helped lead a workshop for humanities faculty on campus who were looking for ways to document their impact for P&T purposes. While the workshop mostly focused on documenting traditional forms of scholarship (journal articles, books, etc.), I encouraged faculty to consider documenting their teaching impact as well. By openly sharing learning objects – syllabi, assignments, classroom activities – or teaching materials (e.g., textbooks, online tutorials, presentations), faculty can transform teaching in their field. Imagine if there were a peer-reviewed open introductory textbook to writing. Imagine, if it were well done, how much it would be used and shared. 

Updated Mar 18, 2014 by Editor Name Missing

My Thoughts about the FIRST Act: Public Access is Not Enough

Many scholars and librarians support public access to research publications funded by U.S. taxpayers. It's hard to argue with the idea that the people who paid for this research have a right to read the results without having to pay a third party (often a commercial publisher) for access. But, in making the case for open access to research published by faculty working at a public university, I sometimes meet supporters of public access that assume the access problem has been solved by federal policy. Reader, we have a problem.

Updated Mar 27, 2016 by Scholarly Communication Librarian

New Open Access Journals on the Horizon from Two Major Scientific Societies

A couple of interesting developments have occurred in the world of open access scientific publishing in the last few weeks.  Two major scientific societies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Royal Society, have both announced plans to publish open access journals.  The AAAS plans to debut their new open access journal, Science Advances, in 2015 while the Royal Society‘s new open access journal, Royal Society Open Science, is due to begin this year.

Updated Mar 04, 2014 by Sciences Librarian