hcoates's blog

Launching the Next Generation Researcher Program

University Library is proud to be co-sponsoring (with the Ruth Lilly Medical Library) the Next Generation Researcher Program. First up is our Resource Fair on March 27 from 11:00am - 2:00pm in the Campus Center, Room 450B. Event information is now available.

Updated Feb 28, 2018 by hcoates

Applying new strategies and evidence to demonstrate the value of public scholarship

The Center has been working with faculty for several years now, helping them to strategize, collect, and report evidence to demonstrate the impact and value of their scholarship. We take a broad view of what counts as scholarship, as we often discuss in our workshops. University P&T and hiring committees, funding agencies, and professional societies generally recognize that scholarship is more inclusive than journal articles, books, and conference proceedings.

Updated Jan 25, 2018 by hcoates

Common approaches to sharing data @ IUPUI

The Figshare Report released yesterday The State of Open Data inspired me to reflect on how researchers at IUPUI are sharing their data. Below, I describe three increasingly common scenarios for data sharing, including common considerations - what data, when, how/where, and what permissions.

Updated Oct 28, 2016 by hcoates

The value of critical appraisal

This week I am wrapping up my last evidence summary for the (open access) Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Journal. I'm feeling quite nostalgic about it. I joined the evidence summary team in mid-2012 and have completed two 2-year commitments. It's been a key writing activity for most of my pre-tenure time here at UL.

Updated Oct 07, 2016 by hcoates

Big Data & Data Science Training series

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched their Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative in 2012. This fall, the BD2K Training Coordinating Center is offering a free weekly webinar series on Fridays at 12:00 ET.

Updated Oct 28, 2016 by hcoates

How do you tweet about research?

One of the fun things about working in a center for digital scholarship are the unexpected and creative questions. Although I spend less time doing reference than I used to, I often use reference questions as an opportunity to take a deep dive into a topic I haven't had time to explore. Recently, someone asked us how to tweet about research. After thinking about it, I realized I do actually have a formula. On the flip side, I get annoyed when journalists and media professionals fail to point to the original research they are discussing. Don't be that person!

Updated Jun 06, 2016 by Webmaster