jdodell's blog

IUPUI Open Access Policy 2016 – A Year in Review

The IUPUI Open Access Policy was adopted by the faculty council on October 7, 2014. Since that day, the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship has been working to promote broad participation while also minimizing the labor for our faculty authors. The policy enables several paths to participation while relying on the Center to bring them altogether and, ultimately, to archive articles in the open access (OA) institutional repository, IUPUI ScholarWorks. Here are a few of the ways that faculty authors can participate in the policy:

Updated Jan 24, 2017 by Webmaster

Gold Open Access on the Rise: IUPUI Leads Indiana in OA Articles

Have you ever wondered if any authors on your campus are choosing open access journals for their articles? Or, if you've seen a few OA journal articles with your faculty members listed as authors, have you wondered how much of the campus article literature is published in OA journals?

Updated Nov 10, 2016 by Scholarly Communications Librarian

Open in Action at IUPUI 2016

Open In ActionWelcome to Open Access Week 2016. We're honoring the theme of this year's OA week, "Open in Action," by highlighting how we work to make open the norm at IUPUI. On each day of OA week we will post about how we're putting open in action.

Updated Oct 24, 2016 by Scholarly Communications Librarian

Preprints in Poetry: Why am I doing this?

First, a confession:
Yes, I write poetry. In fact, I've written poetry slowly but persistently for more than three decades. Most of it is complete garbage; some of it has been published in literary journals. But a great deal more, of modest quality, has never been published, submitted or shared. The last fifteen or so years have been largely dedicated to a single form--five couplets, generally not rhyming; ghazals, loosely understood and (at times) loosely "after" Ghalib.

Updated Oct 17, 2016 by Webmaster

The IUPUI Open Access Policy: A Short Report on Implementation

The IUPUI Faculty Council adopted a rights retention, “opt out” open access policy about 18 months ago. Adopting a policy, however, was just an initial step toward honoring the campus's commitment to the broad and open dissemination of research and scholarship created by its authors. Building a culture of open access requires willing participants, technology, and dedicated effort from academic libraries. Here's a short summary of our implementation efforts to date and the current level of policy participation from faculty on the IUPUI campus.

Updated Apr 15, 2016 by Scholarly Communications Librarian

Dear Authors, Don't Feed the Beast

If you're reading this, you probably already know that scholarly publishing is broken. Yes, it "works" for some people, some of the time. If you're a for-profit publisher you're probably raking in a 30-40% profit margin (Taylor). I doubt you think that's a "broken" model. But if you're an employee of a university, it's broken and you're broke ... even if you don't know it.

Updated Mar 26, 2016 by Scholarly Communications Librarian

Want Readers? ResearchGate vs the Institutional Repository

Here’s a question I get at least a few times every month—I should really start keeping count … it goes something like this: “But I already have a ResearchGate profile, what’s the advantage of keeping other sites about my work up-to-date?” (Sometimes it’s “Academia.edu,” but less and less often on my campus.) It’s a hard question to answer. In part because it assumes so much—that RG is the baseline, that other sites have the same functions, that the advantages are comparable. It’s also a difficult question to answer because it’s often not the real question.

Updated Feb 06, 2016 by Webmaster

IUPUI ScholarWorks: Chasing 30,000 Pageviews per Month

IUPUI ScholarWorks is an institutional repository. It's also a website ... which means that people come looking for our site with keyword searches, direct links, social media sharing and all the other awesome sauce that makes the Internet a busy place.

Updated Mar 27, 2016 by Scholarly Communications Librarian

How Many Repositories Do We Need?

Last month Kathleen Fitzpatrick announced the launch of a new open access repository for the humanities, CORE. I love repositories and I love open access; so, I'm happy to see it. As a new repository, CORE has the advantage of an existing collection of users, members of MLA Commons--an academic social network that hopes to grow into a larger network for the humanities. MLA Commons/CORE is not the first academic social network to enter the repository space, but it's the right direction for repository development. Even so, it's a reactionary development and it's about a decade too late.

Updated Mar 27, 2016 by Scholarly Communications Librarian

What's Hot on ScholarWorks: 2014-2015 Academic Year.

IUPUI students, staff and faculty submitted 1,595 items to IUPUI ScholarWorks during the 2014-2015 academic year. Not bad. We're excited to see the repository grow. I suspect that we'll surpass 6,000 items before the month of September ends.

During that year we also saw a 25% increase in unique visits and a 12% increase in page views--in fact, April 2015 was our busiest month of all time: 26, 880 page views.

We have a short list of "old stand bys" that drive a large portion of our web traffic, but (from time to time) I also like to look at recent submissions to see what's hot. These are new works that are attracting a lot of recent web traffic--while that's no guarantee that people will continue to search for these items, someone is looking for them now and we're glad that IUPUI ScholarWorks can make them discoverable.

Here's the list of the current top ten most viewed items submitted in the 2014-2015 academic year:

Updated Mar 27, 2016 by Scholarly Communications Librarian