pollockc's blog

Mapping for Disaster Relief

When disaster hits, maps become crucial tools for first responders and relief workers to get aid and resources to those affected.
Updated Nov 29, 2017 by Digital Humanities Librarian

What Can Open Data Mean for the Humanities?: A Quick Consideration of Digitized Primary Sources

For my contribution to blog posts for Open Access Week 2016, I wanted to write down some ideas I have had floating in my head in an attempt to better articulate them. 

Updated Oct 26, 2016 by Digital Humanities Librarian

Digital Humanities Resource: The Programming Historian

Lately, I have fallen into deep digital humanities love with The Programming Historian (TPH). TPH is an excellent first step for those interested in learning more about digital humanities but do not know where to start. TPH has peer-reviewed lessons on different digital humanities research methodologies.

Updated Jun 12, 2017 by Digital Humanities Librarian

A Win for Net Neutrality

Yesterday, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), voted to support net neutrality. Briefly, net neutrality is the idea that internet service providers (ISPs), like AT&T and Verizon, can not create high speed Internet highways for websites and other online content, in exchange for money. At the moment, Facebook, Netflix, and the IUPUI University Library website all come to you at the same speed. High speed Internet highways could favor some websites over others for the right price. Net neutrality reinforces the concept that more and more, in a ever-growing digital world, access to the Internet (and the services it provides) is becoming a necessity and everyone should have equal access to it. All of it.

Updated Feb 27, 2015 by Digital Humanities Librarian

Yale's Photogrammar

Yale University has unveiled a new digital humanities tool, Photogrammar, that visualizes and organizes photographs taken during the 1930s and 1940s under the auspices of the Farm Security Administration and the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The photographs serve as artifacts that document the yearning, despair, and humanity of Americans suffering from the effects of the Great Depression. Photogrammar allows its users to put identities and faces to American history, and reconstruct a fuller, more comprehensive understanding of what it was like to live during the Great Depression. Morning Edition, a NPR program, recently covered Photogrammar and spoke with the primary investigator of the project, Professor Laura Wexler. Professor Wexler remarks in the interview that one of the first actions users take when using the interactive map feature of the project is to look for photographs from their hometown.

Updated Sep 25, 2014 by Digital Humanities Librarian

My First Blog Post!

As an IUPUI librarian with the Center for Digital Scholarship, this is my first blog post. I come to IUPUI from Loyola University Chicago where I just earned a MA degree in Digital Humanities. My research interests include copyright and information policies, digital literacy, digital humanities, African American history and late 19th century American history.  I am really excited to get to know IUPUI and take full advantage all that Indianapolis has to offer!

Updated Aug 29, 2014 by Digital Humanities Librarian