dapolley's blog

IUPUI’s New Open Access Journal on Muslim Philanthropy and Civil Society

We are pleased to announce a brand new open access publication, Journal on Muslim Philanthropy and Civil Society. This peer-reviewed journal is international and interdisciplinary in its scope. It publishes research articles, commentary, and book reviews pertaining to the study and practice of Muslim philanthropy and civil society.

Updated Nov 09, 2017 by Social Sciences & Digital Publishing Librarian

SocArXic: An open archive for the social sciences

At the close of OA week, I want to mention a new open repository specifically dedicated to the social sciences, SocArXiv, which launched this past July.

Updated Oct 28, 2016 by Social Sciences & Digital Publishing Librarian

New Open Access Journal at IUPUI

Open Access Journals at IUPUI announces a brand new journal, Chronicles of Health Impact Assessment (CHIA), which launches today! This peer-reviewed journal is aimed at public health professionals working in the field of Health Impact Assessment (HIA). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) defines HIA as,

Updated Oct 26, 2016 by Webmaster

OJS 3.0 is here!

Updated Sep 09, 2016 by Social Sciences & Digital Publishing Librarian

An Open Digital Archive as a Transition to OA

Back in March, the Harvard Library Office of Scholarly Communication (https://osc.hul.harvard.edu) published a preliminary draft of a literature review (https://osc.hul.harvard.edu/programs/journal-flipping/public-consultation/) on methods for converting subscription-based journals to open access (OA).* The report was open for public comment, and while the public comment period has passed, it is definitely worth a read for anyone interested in the future of scho

Updated May 24, 2016 by Webmaster

Making Maps in R

Updated Mar 15, 2016 by Social Sciences & Digital Publishing Librarian

Visualizing Data with R and ggplot2

Lately, I have been spending more time playing around with R. As an R beginner and someone interested in data visualization, one of my favorite packages so far is ggplot2. This package vastly simplifies the process of plotting data and the results are rather aesthetically pleasing. One of the really powerful features of ggplot2 is the way in which it makes visually encoding multiple dimensions of a dataset much easier.

In this brief tutorial, I will plot some data generated using Excel. The data (available here) represent 150 individuals and contains information on their gender, income, time spent commuting to work, student loans, and education level. I fabricated the data so that patterns will emerge in the resulting visualization that mimic what you might expect to see in the real world, but the data are totally fake.

The following presupposes some basic familiarity with R. If you are brand new, you may want to start with a basic R tutorial – there are dozens freely available on the internet.  

Updated Mar 15, 2016 by Social Sciences & Digital Publishing Librarian

Connecting Zotero to cloud storage

I use Zotero a lot, but not as much as some. For those of you out there who find your 300 MB of free file storage dwindling, connecting Zotero to a cloud storage service via its file sync feature is a great way to avoid paying Zotero for additional storage. The solution detailed in this post uses Box. If you don’t have an account with Box through your institution, then you can sign up for a personal account, which provides 10 GB of file storage.

Once you have set up your account with Box, you will need to install Box Sync on your machine. Login to your Box account. Click on your profile name in the upper right hand corner and select Get Box Sync:

Updated Apr 24, 2015 by Social Sciences & Digital Publishing Librarian

Open Access Scholarship and Open Government Information: Two Sides of the Same Coin

As Sunshine Week comes to a close, I cannot help but think about the similarities between open access to scholarly information and the push for increased transparency in our government. I am certainly not the first person to draw parallels between the two, but the conversion usually focuses on public access plans for federally-funded research, such as those required by the NSF and the NIH. The similarities I see run deeper than funding agency mandates.

For those unfamiliar with Sunshine Week, it is a non-partisan effort that seeks to improve the lives of individuals and strengthen communities through increasing access to government information. This is a goal that I am sure many of us in academia find laudable, but what about access to our own scholarship? Surely people stand to benefit from access to this scholarship in many of the same ways that they benefit from open access to government information.

Updated Mar 20, 2015 by Social Sciences & Digital Publishing Librarian