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The top cited articles of all time

Ever wondered what the top 10 cited academic articles of all time look like?  How about the top 100?

A study (Van Noorden et al.) investigated this very topic using citation data provided by Thomson Reuters.  According to their analysis, the top cited paper of all time is an article on protein research written in 1951 and has been cited 305,000 times.  The second most cited article also focused on protein research and received about 200,000 citations.  To make it into the top 10 cited articles, one needs about 40,000 citations… the top 100, about 12,000.

On the other side of the spectrum, about half of all articles indexed by Thomson Reuters have been cited 1 or 0 times.

Want to increase your citation rates?  Deposit your  publications into IUPUI Scholarworks, IUPUI’s institutional repository.  Articles placed in institutional repositories are more likely to read as well as cited.

Last updated by esnajdr on 11/27/2014

I want to live in an open-source house

Perhaps the reality of inhabiting a structure for which the assembly of requires “minimal formal skill or training” would be less than ideal. Nonetheless, the WikiHouse project is one of my favorite examples of something made available under a creative commons license. Part of why I find this project so intriguing is its potential as a unique entry point for talking to people about open-access and the creative commons. The ubiquity of makerspaces are proof, people love this kind of stuff. Imagine teaching a classroom full of students about open access publications they can use for their research and digital media they are free to use in their projects, all while they sit on open-source stools. This scenario could demonstrate to students, in a very tangible way, the power of creating something and sharing it openly under a creative commons license.

-TP

Last updated by dapolley on 11/21/2014

Historical Census Browser

My last post examined a tool for exploring current Census data and exporting it in an easy to use format. Now what about historical Census data? Not the data from a few decades ago – we’re talking about the really old stuff.  Finding this type of historical Census data is notoriously difficult, more so than finding new data. Sifting through the Decennial Censuses that have been digitized is overwhelming for your average library user. Propriety services that offer access to some historical census data with added value, such as GeoLytics, are typically expensive and not always chronologically comprehensive. Fortunately for us, as is often the case, libraries fill the void between the unpolished raw data and the propriety systems that add costly value to this data.

Last updated by dapolley on 10/24/2014

IUPUI Faculty Pass OA Policy

We are pleased to announce another step forward for open access at IUPUI.

Yesterday afternoon the IUPUI Faculty Council passed a campus-wide open access policy based on the Harvard opt-out model. This policy is an outcome of several years of persistent and creative work at IUPUI.

The policy will be implemented by IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship with support from subject liaison librarians as well as all four of our campus libraries. IUPUI's campus includes 17 schools, including the second largest medical school in the United States. This policy will increase access to a wide-range of important scholarship authored on the IUPUI campus.

The policy, which passed “unanimously,” is available from the IUPUI Faculty Council website in draft form as it was approved.

Last updated by klpalmer on 10/08/2014

Nature Communications to become fully open access

A core multidisciplinary science journal, Nature Communications, is set to become fully open access on October 20, 2014.   Read more here.

This is just in time for Open Access Week, October 20-26!  

Last updated by esnajdr on 10/01/2014

Yale's Photogrammar

Yale University has unveiled a new digital humanities tool, Photogrammar, that visualizes and organizes photographs taken during the 1930s and 1940s under the auspices of the Farm Security Administration and the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The photographs serve as artifacts that document the yearning, despair, and humanity of Americans suffering from the effects of the Great Depression. Photogrammar allows its users to put identities and faces to American history, and reconstruct a fuller, more comprehensive understanding of what it was like to live during the Great Depression. Morning Edition, a NPR program, recently covered Photogrammar and spoke with the primary investigator of the project, Professor Laura Wexler. Professor Wexler remarks in the interview that one of the first actions users take when using the interactive map feature of the project is to look for photographs from their hometown.

Last updated by pollockc on 09/25/2014

Indianapolis to Host the 2nd Annual Digital Public Library of America Fest

In a collaborative application from the Indianapolis Public Library, the Indiana State Library, the IUPUI University Library, and the Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis has been selected to host the next DPLA Fest, April 17-18, 2015.  

Last updated by klpalmer on 09/23/2014

Census Data Made Easy

Finding government information can be challenging, even for those of us practiced in the task. Uncovering government data in a form that is easily usable can be even more difficult, graying the hair of many a social scientist.

Investigative Reporters & Editors had built an interface (census.ire.org) that facilitates locating and downloading data from the U.S. Census. Along with connecting users to Census data, the site provides concise descriptions of the geographical units over which the Census is measured. The project is supported by the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute at the University Of Missouri School Of Journalism.

Last updated by dapolley on 09/18/2014

DPLA Presenter Update at Indiana Library Federation Annual Conference

Amy Rudersdorf, Assistant Director for Content at DPLA, will be presenting in Emily Gore’s stead at ILF in November 2014.

Last updated by klpalmer on 09/16/2014

Be Heard: IUPUI Open Access Policy Information Sessions

IUPUI's Faculty Council is currently considering the adoption of a campus-wide, opt-out open access policy. I think that's great news! If you're reading this on a screen, you should think it's great news too. Why? Because this is IUPUI; we do great work here--really. In addition to the second largest medical school in the United States, the IUPUI campus includes a lot of scholars with a passion for civic participation and community engagement. Here's a chance for us to honor those values and to give access to IUPUI's research and scholarship to any reader on the Internet. The good news is that this can be done at no cost to authors and while respecting academic freedom. For the details, read the policy: http://ulib.iupui.edu/OA

If you're not familiar with the Harvard (2008) model open access policy, it's likely that you have some questions about how all this works. Such as: What about copyright? Will this hurt my favorite journal? Why not just use PubMed Central? (Tip: check the policy documentation--where the FAQs are succinctly answered.)

Last updated by jdodell on 09/12/2014