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Humanities Intensive Learning And Teaching Faculty (HILT) 2015 Scholarship

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute will offer four full scholarships to the 2015 Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching (HILT) Institute which will take place on IUPUI’s campus from Monday, July 27th through Friday, July 31st.  

To apply for the scholarship, please send a 1-2 page letter of application to iahi@iupui.edu by May 22. In the letter, clearly outline how attendance at the HILT Institute will assist you in your current or future research or professional development in the arts or humanities. Please attach a 2-page CV to the email. 

All full-time tenured and tenure-eligible faculty from all schools and units at IUPUI are eligible to apply. Under certain circumstances, non-tenure-track faculty members whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity may also be eligible with an explanation in a letter of support from their chair or dean.

Last updated by klpalmer on 05/21/2015

Connecting Zotero to cloud storage

I use Zotero a lot, but not as much as some. For those of you out there who find your 300 MB of free file storage dwindling, connecting Zotero to a cloud storage service via its file sync feature is a great way to avoid paying Zotero for additional storage. The solution detailed in this post uses Box. If you don’t have an account with Box through your institution, then you can sign up for a personal account, which provides 10 GB of file storage.

Once you have set up your account with Box, you will need to install Box Sync on your machine. Login to your Box account. Click on your profile name in the upper right hand corner and select Get Box Sync:

Last updated by dapolley on 04/24/2015

Open Access Scholarship and Open Government Information: Two Sides of the Same Coin

As Sunshine Week comes to a close, I cannot help but think about the similarities between open access to scholarly information and the push for increased transparency in our government. I am certainly not the first person to draw parallels between the two, but the conversion usually focuses on public access plans for federally-funded research, such as those required by the NSF and the NIH. The similarities I see run deeper than funding agency mandates.

For those unfamiliar with Sunshine Week, it is a non-partisan effort that seeks to improve the lives of individuals and strengthen communities through increasing access to government information. This is a goal that I am sure many of us in academia find laudable, but what about access to our own scholarship? Surely people stand to benefit from access to this scholarship in many of the same ways that they benefit from open access to government information.

Last updated by dapolley on 03/20/2015

A Win for Net Neutrality

Yesterday, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), voted to support net neutrality. Briefly, net neutrality is the idea that internet service providers (ISPs), like AT&T and Verizon, can not create high speed Internet highways for websites and other online content, in exchange for money. At the moment, Facebook, Netflix, and the IUPUI University Library website all come to you at the same speed. High speed Internet highways could favor some websites over others for the right price. Net neutrality reinforces the concept that more and more, in a ever-growing digital world, access to the Internet (and the services it provides) is becoming a necessity and everyone should have equal access to it. All of it.

Last updated by pollockc on 02/27/2015

Scientific ideas published in 200 words or less

The new Journal of Brief Ideas is publishing scientific "articles" which are short statements of 200 words or less.  The journal was created to provide a place for brief scientific ideas to be "archived, searchable and citable".

http://www.nature.com/news/journal-publishes-200-word-papers-1.16925


Last updated by esnajdr on 02/22/2015

Lessons learned, reflecting on 2014

Like many faculty across campus, I am in the process of completing my FAR (faculty annual review). This product is something created solely for university purposes and only slightly overlaps with my personal process for reflecting on the previous year and planning for the next. I'm going to skip past the criticisms of the system to get to my point - that this process exists to help us improve. Most of the year, I rush from deadline to deadline, rarely meeting or exceeding my own expectations in this frantic pursuit of accomplishment. Last year in particular, this feeling was prevalent. Looking back, I am proud of what I accomplished but not of the path I chose to get there. This year, I resolve to do better, to achieve a better balance of work, home, and social life. These are some of the things that have inspired me and tools I will be trying out. I hope these are helpful for those of you who, like me, are not entirely satisfied with how your life progressed in 2014.

Last updated by hcoates on 01/15/2015

Serial. A Case for Crowdsourcing Criminal Trials?

Like many others I’ve fallen into the rabbit hole that is Serial.  For those not yet hooked, it’s a spinoff of NPR’s This American Life.  A real life who-done-it or perhaps better, a real life are-we-sure-the-State’s-case-proves-that-the-guy-who got convicted-actually-done-it. Serial’s creators describe the podcast as, “we’ll follow a plot and characters wherever they take us. And we won’t know what happens at the end til we get there.” Its first season presents a riveting 12-episodes that examine past and new evidence for the now 15 year-old murder trial of Adnan Syed, with some of the new “evidence” surfacing only as a result of the podcast.

Last updated by klpalmer on 01/13/2015

The top cited articles of all time

Ever wondered what the top 10 cited academic articles of all time look like?  How about the top 100?

A study (Van Noorden et al.) investigated this very topic using citation data provided by Thomson Reuters.  According to their analysis, the top cited paper of all time is an article on protein research written in 1951 and has been cited 305,000 times.  The second most cited article also focused on protein research and received about 200,000 citations.  To make it into the top 10 cited articles, one needs about 40,000 citations… the top 100, about 12,000.

On the other side of the spectrum, about half of all articles indexed by Thomson Reuters have been cited 1 or 0 times.

Want to increase your citation rates?  Deposit your  publications into IUPUI Scholarworks, IUPUI’s institutional repository.  Articles placed in institutional repositories are more likely to be read as well as cited.

Last updated by esnajdr on 12/02/2014

I want to live in an open-source house

Perhaps the reality of inhabiting a structure for which the assembly of requires “minimal formal skill or training” would be less than ideal. Nonetheless, the WikiHouse project is one of my favorite examples of something made available under a creative commons license. Part of why I find this project so intriguing is its potential as a unique entry point for talking to people about open-access and the creative commons. The ubiquity of makerspaces are proof, people love this kind of stuff. Imagine teaching a classroom full of students about open access publications they can use for their research and digital media they are free to use in their projects, all while they sit on open-source stools. This scenario could demonstrate to students, in a very tangible way, the power of creating something and sharing it openly under a creative commons license.

-TP

Last updated by dapolley on 11/21/2014

Historical Census Browser

My last post examined a tool for exploring current Census data and exporting it in an easy to use format. Now what about historical Census data? Not the data from a few decades ago – we’re talking about the really old stuff.  Finding this type of historical Census data is notoriously difficult, more so than finding new data. Sifting through the Decennial Censuses that have been digitized is overwhelming for your average library user. Propriety services that offer access to some historical census data with added value, such as GeoLytics, are typically expensive and not always chronologically comprehensive. Fortunately for us, as is often the case, libraries fill the void between the unpolished raw data and the propriety systems that add costly value to this data.

Last updated by dapolley on 10/24/2014